Education Gets No Respect From Rubel

Following up on yesterday’s post, The Time Is Now :: Pushing PR Forward – For PR’s Sake, I visited the Going The Distance page at The NewPRWiki.

…surprised?
no room in the conversation
for education so far…

Steve Rubel posted the following there:

The page is now open to all those who have the wiki edit password. If you work in a PR agency and you’d like one, please contact Steve Rubel or ConstantinBasturea

So, I added this:

The page is now open to all those who have the wiki edit password. If you work in a PR agency and you’d like one, please contact Steve Rubel or ConstantinBasturea (Comment: You cannot be “open to all” and have qualifiers like PR agency. It is either open or it is not. Choose.) Robert French

Well, now Rubel has edited the post – but, still no room at the Inn for education.

The page is now open to all individuals who work as solo PR consultants or inside agencies. If you’d like a wiki password, please contact Steve Rubel or ConstantinBasturea

So, what’s an educator to do?

My question remains: What about the PR educators of the world? Why weren’t they included in this effort?

The focus of this effort – from the beginning – has been about the “PR Community” and “Public Relations” overall. From this vantage point, the effort is not in agreement with the stated principles.

In Kindergarten, one of the first lessons Mrs. Lucky Meagher taught us was – “Share.” From the early days to late in life, some lessons still hold true.

Update: “Academics” have now been added to the list of allowed contributors.

The page is now open to all people with a stake in the future of the PR industry. This includes individuals who work as solo PR consultants or inside agencies, client-side practicioners, academics and vendors. If you’d like a password for this page, please contact Steve Rubel or Constantin Basturea.

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0 thoughts on “Education Gets No Respect From Rubel

  1. Jeremy Pepper

    Education is overrated anyway, right? Well, I am not so sure that this was the right venue for educators to become involved with, nor if it will last beyond a month.

    The road to hell is paved with good intentions, and with selfish intentions. This seems to be a bit of both.

  2. Robert

    “Education is overrated anyway, right?”

    You are a very, very bad man. 🙂

    Well, it isn’t as if I wanted to participate anyway. But, I would like for more PR bloggers to reach out to many other PR educators around the world. Think of how it will aid not just the students – but the future employers, too.

    I do appreciate those that do reach out to the students. You know that, don’t you? 🙂

  3. Mike Driehorst

    It does seem that Rubel’s good intentions were blasted by all sides. What about non-profit PR people? What about those who work for associations?

    I believe his intentions and goals are good, but went about it the wrong way. I posted my thoughts at my blog the other day. (Sorry, it’s a post that turned into a book.)

    While the effort can try to be all inclusive, it is not possible. It is good that Rubel is open to revisions. Let’s just hope that this bears some positive fruit.
    Mike

  4. Robert

    Mike, sorry I didn’t respond to this earlier.

    As your post asks, “While his method is very questionnable, why does (or did) he have to open up the New PR Wiki to everyone? Who says he has to?”

    Well, no one says he ‘has to’ open his project up. It was, as you called it “questionnable.” “It” being his strategy and presumptive suggestion that he ‘knew’ who could do the job.

    So, not to rehash old nonsense, let us just notice that if you go to the wiki now, the project has already withered like a promising late bloom greeted by cold winter winds. The last contribution was “December 09” and before that it was “Novembere 30”.

    And, the posts are mostly self-serving “aren’t we great, look what we do/did” and are without any depth. The depth I think everyone wants is methodology and specific practices / applications so that we can – indeed – move forward. The reality is – there aren’t that many public examples of small, medium and/or big firm success stories. Or, if they do exists – the firms likely consider that proprietary and don’t want to share.